Statement of Intent 2007-2010

2. What We Do

Environmental Assessment

The context within which the Ministry operates is influenced by a number of key drivers. Against the backdrop of the make-up of Māori in New Zealand society, these can be broadly categorised in terms of the position of, and opportunities and challenges for Māori inherent within, the cultural, social and economic environments.

Māori in New Zealand Society

In the 2006 Census, the Māori population was 565,329. This represents one in seven, or 14.6% of the overall New Zealand population. The Māori population is highly urbanised (84%) and 24% of all Māori live in the Auckland region. In addition, the Māori population in Australia in 2001 was 72,954.

Although an increasing proportion of the New Zealand population is older (with a median age of 35.9 years), in general, the Māori population is younger (with a median age of 22.7 years). In addition, the Māori population is growing at a faster rate than the non-Māori population. Kinship groups continue to be of significant importance to Māori: recent research confirms that whānau is the core unit of Māori society and the key medium for the transmission of intergenerational knowledge and cultural norms. Along with other kinship groupings, whānau are vehicles for the expression of identity and pursuing development opportunities.

These demographic trends highlight the importance of investing in realising Māori potential now to ensure a sustainable future.

Māori Cultural Development

Māori culture is a unique, treasured and increasingly valued part of New Zealand culture. Successes to date include:

  • Māori culture is often used to distinguish New Zealand internationally, with that usage being meaningful and authentic, and creating pride;
  • There has been an increased usage of Māori words and phrases across New Zealand, particularly reflected in the broadcasting sector;
  • There are around 1000 marae across New Zealand, which continue to be focal points for Māori communities;
  • According to Census 2006, there has been a significant increase in awareness about iwi affiliations (84% of Māori know their iwi). There is increased access to information about whakapapa and iwi, through the internet and through services such as Tuhono;
  • Kapa Haka remains the most popular Māori Art, in terms of participation and spectators, and through wānanga, a pool of kaikaranga, kaiwhakairo and other expert practitioners has developed. There is a growing market for contemporary Māori art, and Māori participation in sport is an important contributor to both cultural connections and social outcomes;
  • Approximately 24% of the Māori population can speak Māori, of which 10% use their Māori language skills on a regular basis. There has been a major shift in the age profile of the Māori speaking population, from a predominantly elderly population to a new generation of young people with high levels of Māori language skills; and
  • 93% of Māori have positive attitudes towards Māori language, with 70% willing to share and progress knowledge of Māori language and culture with all New Zealanders. A further 23% are highly motivated to learn Māori language and participate further in cultural activities, but view this as the exclusive domain of Māori.

The challenges moving forward are:

  • Maintaining and growing the momentum of Māori language and cultural revitalisation;
  • Recognising the “urbanisation” of the Māori population and connecting Māori with their marae and iwi in an increased globalised society;
  • Managing the interface between the role of Māori as kaitiaki of Māori culture and it’s growing place in new Zealand society; and
  • Supporting Māori artists to increase their economic returns while maintaining the integrity of their art.

Te Puni Kōkiri has developed a policy and operational platform to support Māori to address these challenges.

Māori Social Development

There have been some significant gains in Māori social development over the last decade. The successes include:

  • An increase in the average income of Māori in the workforce;
  • A decrease in Māori unemployment to 7.2% for December 2006 quarter;
  • Record levels of Māori participating in formal tertiary education (90,765 in 2005);
  • An increase in Māori participation in early childhood education of first year school students (from 85% in 2001 to 90% in 2005);
  • The number of Māori receiving unemployment benefits dropped from 41,651 in September 1999 to 9,902 in March 2007, a reduction of 64%;
  • The number of registered Māori early childhood education teachers is increasing;
  • Māori health statistics are improving; and
  • A number of programmes and initiatives are in place to improve the quality of Māori housing and the extent of Māori home ownership.

These successes provide a platform for positive Māori development over the next twenty years. However, there are still some specific challenges that we need to think about:

  • 53% of Māori boys left school without qualifications in 2005;
  • Māori continue to be over-represented in the criminal justice sector;
  • There has also been a significant increase in the proportion of Māori living in rented households. Also, there has been a decline in the proportion of Māori living in the house that they own with a mortgage.

Māori Economic Development

Māori are integrated into all levels of the New Zealand economy. Since the Māori economic summit in 1984, Māori have taken charge of their economic development agenda.

Successes to date include:

  • In 2001, the total Māori value added accounted for 1.4% of New Zealand’s economy;
  • Transfer of control to iwi of approximately $750m in assets as full and final settlement;
  • Of Māori claims to commercial fishing;
  • 41 iwi are now mandated and have been allocated Māori fisheries settlement assets;
  • The aquaculture industry is worth over $300m;
  • Māori Forestry landowners are increasingly utilising technology and business skills to create new forestry ventures;
  • Māori entrepreneurial skills are strong;
  • In 5 years, 5,919 businesses have been assisted through the Māori Business Facilitation Service; and
  • Rapidly growing numbers of strong, capable Māori organisations across New Zealand.

The challenges ahead are:

  • Positioning Māori to capitalise on opportunities that will emerge in the innovation economy, and on opportunities that are presented by global economic drivers;
  • Increasing the Māori share of the economy as well as broadening the economic activity base of Māori;
  • Ensuring increased participation of Māori, especially in the knowledge economy through increased participation and investment in industries such as science, research, film and television production;
  • Building on improved performance and stronger accountability in the business environment;
  • Improving the qualification base and associated employability of the Māori population.
  • Increasing the return to owners of collectively owned Māori assets; and
  • Strengthening Māori involvement in the aquaculture industry.

This environmental backdrop, along with the priorities set by government, provide the context for the more detailed framework of outcomes that the Ministry has developed to contribute towards Māori succeeding as Māori. The development of those outcome statements, and the Ministry’s efforts towards achieving them, are disciplined by the Māori Potential Approach.

Outcome Framework

The ministry has maintained the outcome framework that was reflected in the key themes of the Statement of Intent of 2006/07. We have applied the Māori Potential Approach to help us think about the rationale for this work, and its various strands. The figure opposite provides a snap-shot of the ten high level Te Puni Kōkiri outcomes derived from the Te Puni Kōkiri policy framework and aligned to the three Government priorities, leading to the strategic outcome of Māori succeeding as Māori.

Outcome Framework

Te Puni Kōkiri Policy Framework

The Māori Potential Approach provides Te Puni Kōkiri with a disciplined framework and set of guiding principles to give effect to its strategic outcome of Māori succeeding as Māori. It is a forward looking, innovative approach that seeks to accelerate Māori from intergenerational dependency to being high performing contributors to the New Zealand economy and society.

The Māori Potential Approach sharpens the policy focus on Māori people being the key catalyst for achieving exceptional life quality for themselves, their whānau and their other communities of interest. It affirms that Māori have the capability, initiative and aspiration to make choices for themselves, and seeks opportunities for Māori to make choices in ways that support their cultural identity and contribute to exceptional life quality.

The ultimate aim of the Māori Potential Approach is to better position Māori to build and leverage off their collective resources, knowledge, skills and leadership capability to improve their overall life quality.

Together, the Māori Potential Guiding Principles and Framework provide for a consistent transparent and coordinated approach to the Māori Affairs portfolio and Māori public policy.

Māori Potential Guiding Principles

The Māori Potential Guiding Principles are intended to guide the development and implementation of Māori public policy in ways that reflect the strengths and aspirations of Māori people and to maximise opportunities for Māori to realise this potential.

The Guiding Principles are:

Māori Potential - This principle affirms that Māori are diverse, aspirational people with a distinctive culture and value system.

This principle highlights that Māori are a diverse people with significant potential as an indigenous people, strong in culture, as a New Zealand population and as global citizens. It recognises that all Māori have positive potential, regardless of age, gender, location or socio-economic status and that their potential as individuals and/or collectives may be unleashed and realised in dynamic ways.

This principle guides Te Puni Kōkiri in supporting Māori to identify their strengths and potential and develop and facilitate opportunities to maximise this potential in ways that contribute to sustainable success.

Culturally Distinct - This principle recognises the Māori community and their indigenous culture as a net contributor to the identity, wellbeing and enrichment of wider society.

This principle recognises that Māori communities are both part of, and net contributors to, the wider society in which they participate. It distinguishes Māori as the first people of Aotearoa/New Zealand and acknowledges the positive contributions they enrich their communities with, as an indigenous people, and as contemporary citizens of New Zealand and the world.

This principle guides Te Puni Kōkiri to support the creation of an environment and facilitation of opportunities with, and for, Māori to sustain and leverage off their indigenous identity and culture in ways that contribute to their own wellbeing and that of the communities of which they are a part.

Māori Capability - This principle affirms the capability, initiative and aspiration of Māori to make choices for themselves.

This principle guides investment in Māori to bring about change in their life circumstances and their environments. It suggests that by changing the way people view themselves and their power to act on their own behalf, they inevitably change their interaction with and the reaction of the communities or activities they are involved with. This principle advocates that while strengthening organisational and infrastructural capacity is important, it is equally important to build the capability of people and their sense of their choices and power to act.

This principle guides Te Puni Kōkiri to support and facilitate opportunities for investment in Māori people themselves that builds upon their own capability and initiative to be catalysts for change in their own lives.

Māori Potential Framework

Maori Potential Enablers

The Māori Potential Framework is an outcomes-based tool for identifying where and how to support the realisation of Māori potential. It provides a frame of reference that helps expose priorities for intervention, and measure, track and report the sustainable development of Māori over time.

The outcome state of realised potential described within the framework is Te Ira Tangata which refers to the Māori person and the full realisation of their spiritual, emotional, psychological and physical wellbeing. As wellbeing ultimately depends on people having a sense of choice or control over their lives, the framework describes the state of Te Ira Tangata as one in which Māori are exercising confident and responsible choices about the quality of life they experience.

The Framework identifies three key enablers that are fundamental to Māori achieving improved life quality and realising their potential. These are:

Building of Knowledge and Skills (Mātauranga)

This area acknowledges the importance of knowledge to building confidence and identity, growing skills and talents and generating innovation and creativity. Knowledge and skills are considered as a key enabler of Māori potential as they underpin choice and the power to act to improve life quality. As identified in ‘The Social Report 2005’, knowledge and skills enhance people’s ability to meet their basic needs, widen the range of options open to them in every sphere of life, and enable them to influence the direction their lives take.

Strengthening of Leadership and Decision-making (Whakamana)

This area recognises that Māori success relies on their capacity to lead, influence and make positive choices for themselves and others. It acknowledges that the capability and opportunity for Māori to make decisions for themselves, to act in self-determining ways and to actively influence decisions that affect their lives, is integral to individual/collective wellbeing.

This area can incorporate all forms of leadership and decision making, from governance, management and leadership of a collective through to an individual exercising responsible choice for the benefits of themselves and others.

Development and Use of Resources (Rawa)

This area recognises the importance of ensuring Māori can access the necessary resources at the right time and place in order to meet their basic needs and take advantage of opportunities to use, develop and retain their resources in ways that will improve their quality of life.

Resources may include: financial resources (e.g. income, assets), natural resources (e.g. land, water, plants) or physical resources (e.g. food, clothing, housing, technology, buildings and other infrastructure) and all other resources required to meet needs and provide opportunities for Māori cultural, social and economic development.

National Identity

Our country is special, and our people are special. Our creative people are taking New Zealand to the world in new and exciting ways – through film and music, festivals and exhibitions, dance, kapa haka, and literature. Our sports people, artists, performers, and leaders across the community provide inspiration at many levels. There is an evolving New Zealand way of doing things and a stronger New Zealand identity is emerging. Fostering this unique national identity is a key goal identified by the Government.

One of the areas under the overarching theme of strengthening national identity is the reconciliation with our past, so that as a nation we can be confident about our future. That is what the Treaty settlement process is about, putting right the wrongs of the past so we can move forward together.

Te Puni Kōkiri is the lead agency for the reconciliation theme. In this capacity, we have applied the Māori Potential Approach to help us think about the rationale for this work, and its various strands. The Treaty of Waitangi envisaged a co-operative and harmonious relationship between Māori and the Crown in New Zealand, with Māori maintaining and developing their own distinctive culture and value system as the basis for participating fully in wider society as Māori. The Government has accepted that there were historical breaches of this relationship, and is currently in the process of addressing these. The historical Treaty settlement process has considerable momentum. This year the Government will be working with over twenty claimant groups, each with a number of claims.

In addition, the Government has recognised the importance of Māori language and culture within wider New Zealand society. Sustaining the unique aspects of culture, values, and national identity in a world of globalised media and culture has been given a high priority by Government.

To these ends, Te Puni Kōkiri has identified the following priority areas for its work:

  • Facilitating Treaty of Waitangi settlements
  • Developing Māori language and culture
  • Developing an understanding of Mātauranga Māori
  • Supporting development of marae as community focal points

Facilitating Treaty of Waitangi Settlements

Through Treaty of waitangi settlements, the Government is able to address long-standing grievances that have affected the ability and willingness of Māori to engage in New Zealand society. Te Puni Kōkiri’s work facilitates this process.

Te Puni Kōkiri is the Crown’s primary adviser on its relationship with iwi, hapü and Māori. In the Treaty settlements sector, this is reflected by developing advice on Treaty settlement policies, on specific claims, on claimant representation and mandate, ratification, land-banking and the Crown’s obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi.

A key outcome for Te Puni Kōkiri is that durable settlements are reached. Treaty settlements can significantly contribute to returning to claimant groups the economic and other resources needed for community development and a degree of self-determination. This reflects the focus of the Māori Potential Approach on Rawa (Resources), and ensuring that Māori are successfully exercising mana and kaitiakitanga over their resources and are seen as legitimately doing so by other stakeholders. (whakamana)

In the short term, Te Puni Kōkiri will continue to provide the Minister of Māori Affairs with regular reports about the mandate of claimant groups and the governance arrangements that underpin these groups. It will also provide support for Treaty of Waitangi education.

In the medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri will be focused on continuing to ensure Deeds of Mandate are developed and confirmed in a timely manner. Te Puni Kōkiri contributes by referring to its regional networks and working with the Office of Treaty Settlements to:

  • Identify large natural groups of claimants with whom Treaty settlements can be concluded
  • Undertake assessments of submitted Deeds of Mandate and advise Ministers accordingly on the issues associated with recognising the mandate of particular groups
  • Provide advice on settlement ratification processes and the creation of post-settlement governance entities.

The indicator of success will be the number of Deeds of Mandate that are successfully completed in any financial year.

Developing Māori Language and Culture

The Māori language is a taonga that contributes to our country’s distinct and unique cultural identity. It is an official language of New Zealand and is indigenous to our country. The richness and vibrancy of the Māori language has enormous potential to distinguish New Zealand in areas such as tourism, exporting, employment, education and broadcasting. The Māori language is also the primary vehicle for the transmission of Māori culture.

The Government has a clear and longstanding commitment to support the revitalisation of the Māori language, and Te Puni Kōkiri has the lead policy role in this work. Te Puni Kōkiri works in association with Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (the Māori Language Commission), Te Māngai Pāho (the Māori Broadcasting Funding Agency), Māori Television Service, Ministry of Education, Ministry for Culture and Heritage, Ministry of Economic Development, and other related agencies and organisations. Māori broadcasting has been identified as an important vehicle for the transmission of Māori language, and will become increasingly important in the facilitation of connections and access to information to inform decision-making among whānau and communities about various issues they face.

The Māori Language Strategy, published in 2003 by Te Puni Kōkiri and Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (the Māori Language Commission) sets out a number of outcomes for the growth and development of the Māori language. Key among these is increasing the number of people with Māori language skills. Concurrently, many iwi are developing iwi specific language strategies. In addition, a second key outcome is increasing the use of Māori language in key targeted domains (for example, homes and marae). This is consistent with the Māori Potential Approach as it relates to Te Ira Tangata (Life Quality), in particular, the focus on Māori enjoying a secure cultural identity, strong cultural capability and freedom of cultural expression.

Going forward Te Puni Kōkiri will prepare a Māori Broadcasting Policy Framework. It will also be preparing terms of reference for, and then leading, a review of the Māori Television Service Act 2003. In addition, Te Puni Kōkiri will be publishing the results of two surveys about knowledge and use of Māori language. These will inform policy work to revise and update the Māori Language Strategy.

In the medium term Te Puni Kōkiri will be working to ensure there is a clear, coherent and up-to-date policy framework in place for Māori language and Māori broadcasting that directs and co-ordinates the work of sector agencies and others. At the community level, we will continue to provide investment support for the development and implementation of iwi and community language plans. We will work collaboratively with iwi radio stations to strengthen their governance and management arrangements, and we will work with communities to strengthen connections with and between Māori language providers. The indicator of success will be gains made in the number of Māori with Māori language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) at different levels of proficiency. In the future this will be measured through information contained in Statistics New Zealand’s Māori Social Survey.

Developing an Understanding of Mātauranga Māori

Mātauranga Māori is the knowledge base that underpins Māori culture. Accordingly, understanding mātauranga Māori helps us to understand how Māori engage with the world. Derived from traditional knowledge, mātauranga evolves within new generations. Te Puni Kōkiri is interested in understanding mātauranga Māori and how it manifests in the dynamics of contemporary Māori society. In addition, we seek to support the retention and development of mātauranga Māori in culturally authentic ways that allow Māori to gain advantage. In business, traditional values, activities and protocols are providing Māori with natural advantages they can use.

Te Puni Kōkiri recognises that there are significant policy issues associated with cultural and intellectual property rights in this area. Te Puni Kōkiri is working to ensure Māori people and their organisations can maximise their cultural capital through the optimal use of mātauranga Māori. This outcome reflects the concept of cultural distinctiveness in the Māori Potential Approach, as mātauranga Māori is a key foundation of Māori culture.

It is recognised that mātauranga Māori is evolutionary, and can provide an important contribution to the national and international knowledge society. Accordingly, Te Puni Kōkiri is working with experts on mātauranga Māori and alongside agencies with roles and interest in this concept to develop an authoritative, informed, clear and concise understanding of it. Guided by the Māori Potential Approach, Te Puni Kōkiri aims to establish a constructive and credible leadership role with other agencies on mātauranga Māori.

In the short and medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri will be completing a significant body of work on mātauranga Māori, while devising, testing and promulgating a policy statement on mātauranga Māori. At the community level, we will continue to work with whānau, hapü and iwi to facilitate succession planning among experts in mātauranga Māori. We will support work to record and safeguard mātauranga Māori, and to make it available to new generations through modern technology. In addition, we will support opportunities for Māori to promote artwork and taonga that are derived from a mātauranga Māori base. A measure of success of this work will be the utility that other agencies get from the mātauranga Māori policy, and the recognition they give Te Puni Kōkiri’s leadership in this area. At the community level, success will be measured by the collection and analysis of local information that show our investment initiatives have had a positive impact.

Supporting the Development of Marae as Community Focal Points

Marae are important sites for the practical expression of mātauranga Māori. In many communities, they are a centre for cultural activities, connection centres for urban Māori, language rejuvenation, and the centre of social programmes that have as their aim improving the life quality of Māori. In addition, they are store houses of taonga (treasures). Te Puni Kōkiri is focused on ensuring policy frameworks support the self-determination of marae.

A key outcome for Te Puni Kōkiri is that marae are giving full expression to their role as sites for the practical expression of mātauranga Māori. Reflecting the principles of the Māori Potential Approach that address the capability and cultural distinctiveness of Māori, Te Puni Kōkiri will continue working with iwi, and other relevant agencies (for example, the Department of Internal Affairs, Local Government and the New Zealand Fire Service) to ensure the policy environment facilitates marae to identify and address their own development requirements.

In the short term, Te Puni Kōkiri will complete and publish the results of a national survey of marae, which will provide a basis for advice to funding bodies and other agencies that support marae. Te Puni Kōkiri will continue to liaise with those agencies that oversee policy settings that impact on marae. At the community level, we will develop and promulgate toolkits for marae to provide advice about issues such as trustee responsibility, marae insurance, and physical development of marae. In addition, we will support interaction and friendly competition between marae through hui, sporting and cultural activities.

Families - Young and Old

New Zealand has a proud history of social innovation. As a country, over the past century and beyond, we have strived to create a society that bears the hallmarks of fairness and inclusion, and that ensures everyone gets a fair go. That’s the New Zealand way. Continuing this trend of social innovation, the Government has developed an overarching goal for the next ten years that all families, young and old, have the support and choices they need to be secure and be able to reach their full potential within our knowledge based economy. It is about supporting people of every age to make the most of their abilities and opportunities, to be a valued part of their families and their communities, and to enjoy health, safety, and security. Five themes have been identified to support this goal: strong families; healthy confident kids; safe communities; better health for all; and positive aging.

Te Puni Kōkiri is interested in realising Māori potential through all of these themes. Principles of the Māori Potential Approach are informing our understanding of these topics. In particular, we recognise that Māori are culturally distinct and organise their family units as whānau; and that Māori are capable and have the aspiration and initiative to make choices for themselves within whānau. Over the past two years Te Puni Kōkiri has undertaken an extensive whānau Development Action and Research programme. Key findings from this research include:

  • Whānau is the core unit of Māori society, and the primary vehicle for intergenerational transmission of knowledge and cultural norms;
  • Whānau development is most likely where whānau can identify their own aspirations and priorities, and plan and execute their own initiatives.

A strong family is a secure family. Families – Young and Old is about safety, health, security, and opportunity for all members of every family, today and in future generations. Building upon our research into whānau, Te Puni Kōkiri believes maximising whānau potential is an effective and efficient approach to addressing the five themes within the Government’s overarching goal for Families – Young and Old.

We have identified the following priority areas in our work to maximise whānau potential:

  • Enhancing whānau outcomes
  • Developing whānau connections
  • Strengthening whānau leadership

Enhancing Whānau Outcomes

Whānau are the core unit of Māori society, and as such are a crucial change agent for positive Māori development and an accelerant for realising Māori potential. Te Puni Kōkiri believes that where there is strong whānau infrastructure, whānau members will have increased life choices, life quality and cultural gain. Regardless of age, gender, location or socio economic status, everyone has positive potential. The ultimate aim of Te Puni Kōkiri is to see Māori achieve exceptional life quality, with Māori themselves identifying and developing the opportunities to maximise their potential. Te Puni Kōkiri sees maximising whānau potential as vital to improving life quality. It wants Māori families who are strong, healthy and connected. In short, strong whānau are a prerequisite for overall Māori development. Te Puni Kōkiri is interested in strengthening the policy and operational environment to enhance, among others, justice, housing and labour market outcomes for whānau.

Te Puni Kōkiri works with social development agencies including the Ministry of Social Development; Ministry of Education, Ministry of Health; Housing New Zealand and Department of Building and Housing; Families Commission; and other agencies with an interest in whānau development. we will continue to seek to partner agencies which have primary responsibility for the delivery of services to whānau, to find new ways to accelerate improved outcomes for whānau.

A key outcome for Te Puni Kōkiri is for Māori to be able to realise their potential in whatever domain they choose as culturally distinct and capable whānau. To this end, over the next two years Te Puni Kōkiri will be promoting a collaborative partnership model with other government agencies, which may include local level priority approaches and the brokering of integrated contracts. Te Puni Kōkiri will also be providing substantial second opinion policy advice to social development agencies about issues that impact on whānau.

In the medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri is working to enhance the cultural, social, economic and environmental facets of whānau life. Te Puni Kōkiri will be contributing to this by compiling a robust evidence base for policy development through research and evaluation of whānau initiatives. Te Puni Kōkiri will be working to strengthen sustainable collaborative relationships with iwi and Māori who hold a mandate to represent whānau. It will also seek to enhance the return on investment in whānau made by the Māori Potential Fund through evaluation, to determine the most cost effective methods of realising whānau potential. At the local level, we will be working directly with whānau to ensure that they are engaging with education and employment opportunities. We will also work to strengthen whānau participation to ensure that they can access all the benefits and services that they are entitled to in the health and social development sectors. In addition, we will support community programmes and services that are designed, developed and delivered by Māori in the justice sector.

Developing Whānau Connections

Through research, whānau have identified the importance of reconnecting with each other, so they can rebuild whānau knowledge and traditions and the practices of whānau knowledge transfer. Te Puni Kōkiri is interested in ensuring that policy frameworks support whānau connections, and enable whānau to access their appropriate entitlements.

A key outcome for Te Puni Kōkiri is ensuring that whānau are connected with each other. Whānau use their connectedness to develop their whānau identity through the transfer of knowledge and traditions, and to strengthen whānau as effective organisational institutions. Through these processes, whānau provide support for their children and their kaumātua. This reflects the concept of Te Ira Tangata in the Māori Potential Approach, whereby strong social and cultural connectedness is a transformational feature of Māori lives and collective experiences.

Te Puni Kōkiri works in association with iwi and Māori organisations; the Ministry of Social Development; Ministry of Health; Housing New Zealand and Department of Housing and Building; Families Commission; and other agencies with an interest in whānau development.

In the short-term, Te Puni Kōkiri expects to develop and publish information and toolkits about aspects of whānau connections. It will provide policy advice to agencies about aspects of whānau connections in whānau development, and build measures of whānau success and produce success models and case studies. At the local level, we will provide support for whānau to develop and administer whānau trusts as the vehicles for whānau connections. we will also support activities that provide opportunities for whānau to connect and re-connect, including sporting events, hui and wānanga, and expos.

In the medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri will engage with whānau through intermediaries that have a focus on whānau development. Te Puni Kōkiri will support these agencies by establishing a clear understanding of, and policy position on, the nature of whānau connections in particular, and whānau development in general. It will work with intermediaries to support whānau connections, and report to the Minister of Māori Affairs and other key stakeholders about issues associated with whānau connections, and whānau development.

Strengthening Whānau Leadership

In recent years, we’ve seen improvements in Māori education, employment and health status. In turn, this has meant that Māori are progressively taking charge of their own destiny, playing an increasingly crucial part in New Zealand’s economy through education, employment and enterprise. whānau have identified leadership as a critical factor in overall whānau development.

There are many aspects of this leadership including cultural leadership, governance of whānau assets, and the provision of succession planning with whānau. The Māori resource base and economy are substantial and growing. Leaders with broad skills and a high level of expertise are required to manage and grow them. By supporting the effective governance and management of Māori assets and enterprises, we help to create an environment that significantly improves the return to Māori and helps improve life quality. Whānau also require strong leaders to ensure their continued social and cultural development. Policy development on whānau and Māori, therefore, needs to reflect and contribute to the maintenance and advancement of Māori leadership.

Te Puni Kōkiri work is directed at supporting whānau to identify and pursue their leadership interests. A key outcome identified by Te Puni Kōkiri is having Māori leaders in place that are providing leadership within their whānau, hapü and iwi, and within New Zealand and onto a global stage. They will be exercising greater management of assets and people for economic, social and cultural development. This reflects the concept of whakamana in the Māori Potential Approach, whereby strong and visionary leadership at all levels of Māori society drives and sustains collective success and advancement. Te Puni Kōkiri works with agencies that have a role and interest in whānau and Māori leadership, including the Ministry of women’s Affairs, Ministry of Education, and the Leadership Development Centre.

Over the short term, Te Puni Kōkiri will be completing a major piece of work on the accelerants of whānau and Māori leadership, which will be published and distributed. We will also maintain our nominations database so we can identify and support Māori into governance and leadership roles. In the medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri will be developing a clear understanding of whānau and Māori leadership and the conditions and circumstances that promote its development. We will be developing a work programme to support succession planning at all levels of Māori society. At the local level, we will provide support to increase the capacity and capability of whānau to govern and manage their whānau trusts and collectively owned assets. We will support iwi and sector awards that recognise and promote outstanding leaders. We will also work with other government agencies and local government to support them in connecting and engaging with whānau and iwi leadership.

Economic Transformation

The Government is committed to raising incomes and quality of life for all and is emphasising economic transformation as one of its three priority areas for the next decade. It has identified the need for more innovators, risk takers, and entrepreneurs. New Zealand is a nation of inventors and adaptors. There is a strong culture of pragmatic problem solving. We are a closely networked community and ideas travel well. All of that contributes to a highly innovative climate. Economic transformation seeks to build on this history of innovation and is about creating a knowledge-led, innovative economy driven by creative business, underpinned by a world-class infrastructure, and conducted in an environmentally sustainable way.

Through economic growth, society collectively generates the output needed to improve services and raise living standards. The most significant contribution to Māori economic transformation through this priority area will come from Māori having the capacity to lead, influence and make positive decisions for themselves on their participation in the economy through:

  • Education
  • Employment
  • Effective utilisation of collective assets
  • Investment decisions

The role of Te Puni Kōkiri will be to create an enabling environment for Māori to ensure economic transformation will lead to higher incomes and greater participation in the knowledge-based economy through innovation and creativity. The challenge is to build a sustainable economy based on innovation and quality. A commitment to greater sustainability in our resource use and way of life will ensure our environment is protected and our economy insulated from significant risk. Investment in skills, learning, research, science and technology will increase the skills and knowledge of New Zealanders, which will ultimately raise living standards for all.

In understanding the role of Māori in economic transformation, Te Puni Kōkiri will focus on building a strong evidence base and policy capabilities to support:

  • Maximising Māori collective assets
  • Improving education and skills
  • Increasing Māori innovation and participation in emerging markets

Maximising Māori Collective Assets

The Māori commercial asset base is substantial – conservatively estimated at around $9 billion in 2001. Māori have collective ownership interests in significant assets, including land, fisheries, aquaculture and forestry. Te Puni Kōkiri is therefore focused on creating an enabling environment to ensure Māori maximise the return on all of these assets.

Māori economic development is inextricably linked to our nation’s economic growth. Our challenge is therefore to unlock the potential that exists in the growing Māori asset base and growing Māori population. A key outcome for Te Puni Kōkiri is seeing an increased return to owners from Māori land.

To do this, Te Puni Kōkiri will continue to work in association with the Ministry of Justice, Land Information New Zealand, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, Ministry of Economic Development, Ministry for the Environment, Ministry of Education, New Zealand Trade and Enterprise, and the Foundation of Research Science and Technology.

Te Puni Kōkiri contributes by providing policy advice and policy frameworks for Māori land. Te Puni Kōkiri monitors and liaises with sector agencies about their contribution to this work. We also provide funding for innovative interventions; and broker relationships for success within the sector.

Over the next two years, Te Puni Kōkiri expects to continue monitoring the progress of the Māori Freehold Land Registration Project – using milestones and timelines outlined in the Māori Land Development Action Plan as a measure of success.

In the medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri is interested in seeing all Māori land appropriately registered and information about land status and use made readily available. Te Puni Kōkiri wants to ensure there is a range of governance structures in place that provide for Māori aspirations in relation to their land, and training is available for administrators of this land. Ensuring that there is co-ordinated Government support for Māori land development by the owners is a priority for Te Puni Kōkiri.

At the local level, we will continue to work with whānau to develop innovative options for using their land to generate returns, and to provide information to iwi and Māori asset-holders about national and international business and environmental trends and issues that affect them. We will liaise with other government agencies to ensure that Māori can access information to support their decision-making about the management of their assets.

Improving Education and Employability

Te Puni Kōkiri recognises that the most significant contribution to Māori economic development over the next 20 years is likely to come from improving the education and skills of Māori people. This is because the ability to maximise the return on collectively owned assets is inextricably linked to having a highly skilled and innovative Māori workforce. Māori participation and achievement in education and meaningful employment opportunities will play a vital role that begins with early childhood education.

Working in association with the Department of Labour, Ministry of Social Development, Ministry of Education, Tertiary Education Commission, Te Kohanga Reo National Trust, Te Runanganui o Ngā Kura Kaupapa Māori and other related agencies and organisations Te Puni Kōkiri provides advice and support to enhance Māori education, employment and enterprise outcomes.

Key outcomes for Te Puni Kōkiri are seeing Māori learners achieve the shared competencies and knowledge needed by everyone. Also, seeing Māori learners have the knowledge and competencies to participate in te Ao Māori as they choose. These outcomes are consistent with Ka Hikitia, a 2006 engagement document prepared by the Ministry of Education for setting priorities in Māori Education. They also reflect the focus of the Māori Potential Approach on Mātauranga, in particular having the relevant life and technical skills and the confidence to use them to achieve their aspirations and quality of life.

A key outcome for Te Puni Kōkiri related to employment is to see Māori achieving their employment potential through sustainable employment, increased participation, improved skills and qualifications and increased entrepreneurship. These outcomes are consistent with the Government’s policy framework for sustainable employment for Māori. It also reflects the focus of the Māori Potential Approach on Rawa, in particular, the focus on Māori enjoying an optimal level of wealth and contributing to national prosperity.

Te Puni Kōkiri contributes by providing policy advice about the policy frameworks for Māori education and Māori employment, and specific issues within these frameworks. Te Puni Kōkiri monitors and liaises with sector agencies about their contribution to this work. we also provide funding for innovative interventions; and broker relationships for success within the sector.

Over the short term, Te Puni Kōkiri expects to provide policy advice about the implementation of the Māori Education Strategy and the policy framework for sustainable employment outcomes for Māori. It will also develop a quantitative and qualitative research database in these sectors, as well as contributing to policy work around Māori Teacher Supply. At the local level, we will work with whānau and iwi to support greater Māori engagement with education and the achievement of qualifications that create pathways into strategic and emerging sectors of the innovation economy. We will also facilitate relationships and opportunities for young Māori to enter into knowledge-based industries, and to develop the necessary skill base to build their own businesses.

In the medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri is seeking to ensure that there are clear, coherent and up-to-date policy frameworks that address Māori education and Māori employment across the whole-of-government. Te Puni Kōkiri will be helping to address specific issues as they arise, and contributing to regular monitoring and reporting.

Important indicators of the success of Te Puni Kōkiri work will be an increasing number of Māori learners leaving secondary school with formal qualifications; and the number of Māori in the workforce, at increasing levels of income. Te Puni Kōkiri will monitor this information through its regional offices trend and activity reports, achievement data collected by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority and the Ministry of Education, and the quarterly Household Labour Force Survey.

Increasing Māori Innovation and Participation in Emerging Markets

Māori are active participants in this process of economic transformation. The identification, development and commercialisation of new products and approaches is the innovation challenge for all enterprises. Te Puni Kōkiri is interested in ensuring that Māori can leverage off the opportunities available to them through New Zealand’s growing, globalised, and knowledge-based economy. It should be acknowledged that Māori values, activities and protocols may in fact be providing Māori with natural competitive advantages that they can exploit.

Working in association with the Ministry of Economic Development, Statistics New Zealand, and other organisations and agencies focused on economic transformation, Te Puni Kōkiri is seeking to ensure growth and diversification of the collective asset base leading to an increasing Māori share of the economy. Additionally, another key outcome is a broadening of Māori economic activities through innovation.

Te Puni Kōkiri contributes by providing policy advice about the policy frameworks for Māori innovation. Te Puni Kōkiri monitors and liaises with sector agencies about their contribution to this work. We also provide funding for innovative interventions; and broker relationships for success within the sector.

in the medium term Te Puni Kōkiri will be developing an evidence base for measuring Māori participation in the economic system. It will also be developing a forecasting tool for measuring the impact of Māori participation on specific sectors of the economy. It will also be seeking to enhance the evidence base for measuring Māori participation in the different regional economies.

In the medium term, Te Puni Kōkiri will be seeking to ensure that there is a strong evidence base of Māori participation in the economic system. This economic evidence base of Māori participation will ensure that Te Puni Kōkiri can lead and provide informed advice on specific areas of growth and innovation.

Measures of success will include the share held by Māori of the economic system and the share held by Māori of the export market. This information will be collected through updating the Social Accounting Matrix, as well as forecasting models, information from Statistics New Zealand and noting iwi specific initiatives.

Summary of Indicators

Te Puni Kōkiri will use the following indicators to track progress towards the achievement of the outcomes described above:

Strengthening National Identity

  • The number of deeds of mandate that are completed in any financial year.
  • The number of Māori people with Māori language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) at different levels of proficiency.
  • The uptake of our policy work around mātauranga Māori among key agencies.
  • The number of marae that are used at least monthly.

We will collect this information using various tools, including: the Māori Language Survey and the Marae Survey being undertaken by Te Puni Kōkiri, and the Māori Social Survey being developed by Statistics New Zealand

Families Young and Old

  • The number of active whānau trusts.
  • The uptake of whānau development tools that have been developed by Te Puni Kōkiri.
  • The number of Māori people in governance roles on national and local government entities.

We will collect this information using various tools, including: a database of whānau trusts, and an appointments database administered by Te Puni Kōkiri.

Economic Transformation

  • The milestones and timelines in the Māori Land Development Action Plan are delivered.
  • The number of Māori leaving secondary school with formal qualifications.
  • The number of Māori in the workforce, at increasing levels of income.
  • The Māori share in the wider New Zealand economic system.
  • The Māori share in the overall export market.

We will collect this information using various tools, including: a Social Accounting Matrix that has been developed by Te Puni Kōkiri, and achievement data collected by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority and Ministry of Education, and the quarterly Household Labour Force Survey.

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